Authors

Suzanne Redfearn

February 1, 2016
suzanne-redfearn2

Born and raised on the east coast, author Suzanne Redfearn moved to California at the age of fifteen. After graduating summa cum laude from California Polytechnic University, she worked as an architect, specializing in residential and commercial design, before pursuing her dreams of being an author.

Published in October of 2013, Redfearn’s first novel, Hush Little Baby, is a gripping page-turner about a determined mother’s fight to rescue her children from her violent husband.

Redfearn’s upcoming novel, No Ordinary Life, which will be released on February 2nd, tells the story of a young mother’s quest to protect her children from the dangerous world of Hollywood. Suspenseful and unforgettably moving, No Ordinary Life explores the unbreakable bonds of family and the astounding devotion of a mother’s love.

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Authors

Anne Girard

January 25, 2016
Anne Girard

In her first novel under a pen name, 2014’s Madame Picasso, historical fiction author Anne Girard brought to life the mesmerizing tale of Eva Gouel, the unforgettable woman who stole the heart of the greatest artist of our time, Pablo Picasso. After the pair’s chance meeting at an art exhibit, a lifelong connection is formed, but their romance is not one without obstacles. With a sharp eye for detail, Girard paints an intricate portrait of one of the most fascinating men in art history and the woman who would become his unsung muse.

Girard recently released her second work, Platinum Doll, which is set against the backdrop of the Golden Age of Hollywood and tells the enchanting story of Jean Harlow, one of the most iconic stars in the history of film. Alongside a glittering cast of Hollywood titans — Clark Gable, Clara Bow, Howard Hughes and many more — Harlow achieves her dream of seeing her name in lights, but learns along the way that fame always comes with a price.

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Authors

Joseph Souza

January 12, 2016
Joseph Souza

Acclaimed New England author Joseph Souza got his start writing short stories in the crime genre before an idea for an apocalyptic horror story inspired him to pen his first novel, 2012’s The Reawakening, which won Souza the Maine Literary Award. Continuing the story in a pair of follow-up novels, 2013’s Darpocalypse and 2014’s Darmageddon, Souza explored the difficult choices characters are forced to make in a world on the brink of collapse before he returned to the crime genre with 2015’s Unpaved Surfaces, the gripping tale of family torn apart by the disappearance of their nine-year old son.

But it’s not all darkness and pain for Souza. He has a lighter side as well, one that is on full display in his most recent work, Fujita’s Itch & Other Stories.

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Musicians

Donica Knight

December 30, 2015
Donica Knight

As a student at Auburn University in 2008 and 2009, Donica Knight would wait in line for hours for the student section gates to open for football games at Jordan-Hare Stadium. Even after leaving school to pursue a music career, Knight’s love of Auburn football remained strong, and in 2013, she wrote and recorded “Great To Be,” a celebration of the university’s rich football heritage.

In early 2016, the talented and charismatic singer and songwriter will release her debut EP, Can’t Buy a Southern Girl, which features an exciting blend of country, blues and gritty Southern rock inspired by the likes of Bonnie Raitt, Patsy Cline, Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Rolling Stones. A video for the album’s scorching first single, “Love Ain’t A Prize,” directed by veteran cinematographer Noel Maitland, was released online in September of 2015 and promptly earned airplay around the country and a position on the IndiMusic TV Top 21 Video Countdown. Donica’s success has led to a rigorous touring schedule throughout the southeast, during which she has performed more than 350 dates, opening for iconic acts including Hank Williams Jr., Luke Bryan, Kenny Rogers, The Band Perry and many more.

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Entrepreneurs

Dan Dizio

December 18, 2015
Dan Dizio

Dan DiZio got his start in the pretzel business at the age of 11, when a neighbor by the name of Steve Nuel recruited him to help sell bags of fresh pretzels to drivers of cars stopped at red lights along Roosevelt Boulevard in northeast Philadelphia. Back then, there were just ten pretzel-making machines in the city of Philadelphia, with the bakers working all night and selling the fresh pretzels to vendors, convenience stores, schools and office workers before closing their factories each morning.

After graduating from East Stroudsburg University, DiZio briefly worked as a stockbroker before he and his college roommate, Len Lehman, returned to the pretzel business in 1998, when they purchased a 1920s pretzel-making machine for $11,500 and rented a space in the Mayfair area of Philadelphia. No strangers to entrepreneurship — in college, the pair ran a “party house,” charging $5 a head and hiring a cleaning crew to come in in the morning — they initially planned on baking at night and closing in the morning, like traditional bakers. But when the smell of freshly baked pretzels wafting through the neighborhood had customers lining up at the door, they realized they were onto something.

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